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6 Tips About How To Source Passive Candidates

If you are a recruiter or works in the staffing industry, I’m sure you know that passive candidates are usually the best candidates. But passive recruiting is often easier said than done. You’ll have[...]

November 13, 2018

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5 Things Independent Recruiters Should Know About Working from Home

The internet really is the gift that keeps on giving. Aside from the obvious awesome things about the web, like dank memes and streaming movies, it’s also given us the ability to work from home. In days past, this was reserved for a finite number of occupations. Now, it seems like telecommuting jobs are a dime a dozen. But be warned: working from home is not always as easy as it sounds.

If you’re just starting out as an independent recruiter, or any remote job, really, there are a few things you need to know about working from home. Sure, the commute time (read: none) is great, and working in your PJs is amazing, but just as with any job, there are challenges. I’ve been working from home for about five years now, and I’ve faced every telecommuting trial imaginable - for example, having to write a blog while my five roommates held band practice in the same room. Although my living situation is a lot quieter these days, there are still hurdles that I - and every other telecommuter in the world - must overcome. Here’s what I’ve learned.

You Can Make a Comfy Workspace Anywhere

A home office is a luxury that many of us can’t afford. If you have space for one, good for you. I hate you. But if you’re a normal person, you probably don’t have an extra bedroom just lying around. That’s okay! A comfortable workspace doesn’t have to mean a designated office. All you need is a chair, a surface, and a place to keep stuff organized. For this reason, I’ve found that kitchen islands/bar top counters work well. If your house is super tiny, like mine, you might want to get a coffee table with a lift top, so you can work from your couch without being hunched over all day. Speaking of which…

Crappy Posture Will Make You Hurt All Over

If you work on a computer, your neck and eyes are going to hurt at some point. That’s just how it goes. If you work on a computer and you have bad posture, everything is going to hurt. You can make adjustments to your workspace to combat this, but I’ve found that a more effective tactic is to take frequent breaks to stretch your limbs and eyes. Follow the 20/20/20 rule to avoid eye strain, and sneak in a few mobility exercises when you can – like while you’re making lunch or waiting for a call. The best part is, you won’t have a gaggle of co-workers looking at you while you work out.

People Won’t Respect Your Office Hours

This has to be the #1 most annoying thing about working from home. Trust me; it will happen to every telecommuter. Your friends will try to get you to ditch work and go do stuff with them. Your parents will call you to chat. Basically, everyone will think that “working from home” means “not really working at all.” So, what’s the fix? Repetition. You need to ask people to respect your office hours every time they pester you. You might even want to set your cell phone to auto reply that you’ll call back AFTER WORK, MOM. Eventually, people will get the hint. I promise.

There’s a Learning Curve to Communicating

Communicating is easy when you work in a traditional office. Not so with a remote job. You can’t just stroll over to Karen’s cubicle every time you have a question. As such, you’ll need to sink some time into learning how to communicate effectively and efficiently. As an independent recruiter with Crowdstaffing, this means working closely with account managers to clarify client requirements before submitting, and staying in touch with your candidates throughout the job pipeline. Resourcefulness goes a long way, too, which is why we built an ever-expanding Knowledge Base for our recruiting partners. There, you’ll find answers to common questions, as well as helpful email templates and other resources.

Pack a Lunch Even Though You’re Not Leaving

You might think you’ll have enough time to cook a proper lunch, but you won’t. Here’s what will happen: you’ll get in the zone working on a project and completely forget you’re hungry until it’s too late. By that time, you’ll be too hungry to cook, and you’ll end up eating an entire bag of Doritos for lunch. Don’t do that. Pack your lunches ahead of time. I like to make a big dinner on the weekend, then divvy up leftovers for the next few days.

Any job is going to have an adjustment period. So, if you’re just getting into the wonderful world of telecommuting, hang in there. Ironing out the kinks may take some time, but you’ll soon find that you never want to work in an office again. I know I don’t.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scott Giroux
Scott Giroux
A long-time innovator with extensive leadership experience, Scott served on the executive team of a leading North American staffing firm prior to joining our team. At Crowdstaffing, Scott leads the company’s global operations and account management team and also drives growth of the talent supplier side of Crowdstaffing’s hiring marketplace. "There is so much untapped potential in our industry I’m thrilled to be part of a movement that is pioneering a connected marketplace for everyone in the hiring ecosystem."
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